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Thread: with the death of Net Neutrality, Is it time for an alt-net?

  1. #1
    To get around ISP throttling/control, you’d probably have to use something like a wireless mesh network. Completely sidestepping the Internet. There are plenty of examples/demo’s of this option, but it’s not practically going to replace the internet we currently have. You’d need dedication, scaling, and content. You’d be shifting the monetary burden from the ISP onto the end user. We’d almost be starting over from scratch in terms of getting America connected.

  2. #2
    To get around ISP throttling/control, youd probably have to use something like a wireless mesh network. Completely sidestepping the Internet. There are plenty of examples/demos of this option, but its not practically going to replace the internet we currently have. Youd need dedication, scaling, and content. Youd be shifting the monetary burden from the ISP onto the end user. Wed almost be starting over from scratch in terms of getting America connected.

  3. #3
    Total noob here, so please don’t make fun of me... but is it possible to build and design a non-profit, open source alt-net to rival the internet?

  4. #4

    with the death of Net Neutrality, Is it time for an alt-net?

    the way I understand how the internet works, it’s basically a bunch of servers communicating through ISP’s and DNS nodes to each other and individual devices, each with their own IP address.
    With the great advances we see in Block-chain and P2P networks, would it be possible to decentralize the process of connection nodes, controlled by governments and ISP’s, creating instead a de-centralized, highly variable and flexible network that uses individual devices to dedicate a part of their computing power to compute alt-net traffic individually?

  5. #5
    perhaps using a completely redesigned Protocol to rival HTTP?
    i’m sure it would have the adverse effect in the beginning, as without dedicated nodes, it would take longer for individual packets to reach their respective destination, but with an increased amount of users and benevolent servers, perhaps it would get better with time?






  6. #6
    The internet is already decentralised and flexible.
    The problem is is that someone has to provide the physical infrastructure and that isn’t cheap to do within a country let alone across oceans.



  7. #7
    I’m a little rusty, it’s been a few years since my Computer Networking course.
    Technically, the internet is just a series of servers which you can talk to using a standardized set of communication protocols. There are a few central pieces, like the Root Name Servers which help your browser and any routers identify the rest of the servers on the internet, but the core is fairly simple.

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