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Thread: The Future Of Video Games

  1. #1

    The Future Of Video Games

    I think you may need to proofread a few more times and provide a proper works cited before you hand in your writing assignment. Also very few of your statements have proof to back them up. If I were to guess, if you submitted this in its current state, you’re looking at a 50%, maybe a 60% if you’re lucky.
    For example, streaming games has been around for quite a while while not so great results. The two companies that first tried this (OnLive and Gaikai) aren’t really around anymore (well Gaikai technically is part of Sony and their tech runs PSNow). The issue you run into is the infrastructure around these services, and things like Data caps that pretty much make it impossible to do streaming of any kind (Just ask anyone with a Netflix account and a data cap).

  2. #2
    I didn’t think I’d ever type these words, but: I think Nintendo is showing us the future of video games.
    It’s ridiculous how much the Switch changes how I think about my gaming time. After having dumped almost a hundred hours into Zelda, having to sit in front of a TV to play Persona 5 feels like an archaic, frustrating limitation. Even though "in front of the TV" is how I choose to play Zelda 50%+ of the time – it’s all about that choice. Heck, I can now play certain games while walking on the treadmill, and that’s huge for me. Time is a valuable resource, especially as I get older, and anything that helps save me time, or double up on time usage, is that much more valuable.
    I was bullish on VR, but I’ve had a PSVR for awhile, and while certain experiences – like Resident Evil 7 – aretruly amazing, it just doesn’t have the simplicity and convenience that something like the Switch does, which is why, despite how undeniably cool VR is, it’s currently gathering dust behind my TV. The future isn’t just about what’s cool, but also about what has the power to catch on with the mainstream, and I don’t think VR is there yet, and it won’t be until its substantially more convenient.
    If you told me that the Switch was the future before I actually bought and used the Switch, I would’ve thought you were crazy, but playing really is believing, and I think it has the power to change the way I play games, similar to how having a Kindle changed the way I read.

  3. #3
    The Vita personified this in its direction, as did the PSP.
    I issue I have with the Switch being the real shining star of all of this is that it heavily highlights all of the limitations of this form factor as well. I was listening the Player One Podcast this week and they talked about the big controversy of the Lego City Undercover sticker. Even if it isn’t truthful, it highlighted the big sticker shock that is less of an issue on the other dedicated home consoles. They talked about those who wanted Doom on the platform, but then went on about how it wouldn’t be viable given its size, the Switch cart size limitations and the base internal storage amount. It is a future concept that to date is not ready for the bigger publishers to really back unless they really cut corners somewhere to make it happen. For instance, Persona 5 is a 40 GB game and that doesn’t include the extra 3 GB needed for the Japanese audio track. Tack on any potential DLC and you have an issue that the Switch, in its current form, could not support with a burdened added cost to the user.
    The Switch is a future concept released with today’s technology. It just isn’t there yet unless you have different expectations for a home console.

  4. #4
    I love my Switch as-is, but don’t entirely disagree with that assessment. But then, this thread is about the future of gaming
    tl;dr – I don’t think the future of gaming is about more horsepower or even necessarily VR/AR, but about convenience.

  5. #5
    I tend to think of software interaction in two ways:
    1) Experiences that tend to have a high expense tied to them (that expense does not have to be money by the way; it could be time, effort, space) but return with an extremely valuable experience that consumes you in the moment.
    2) Experiences that are smaller in scope, bite-sized and may not by itself be world-changing, but is easily accessible at any given moment and really convenient.

    A lot of people tend to think that if a product doesn’t do the second one, it’s a failure (this is especially true with the press) but I disagree; most successful products only focus on one of the two. Gaming itself consists of a broad range of things, so there will be products that fit in one and products that fit in the other, but it will all be gaming nonetheless. The big question is, what are those products? It’s most likely to be VR and AR.
    VR is the high-cost, high-reward one. While I don’t want to undermine the efforts it takes to make great VR hardware, the size and weight of headsets and whether or not they become wireless is not some huge obstacle against the long term success of the industry. That’ll change over time like every industry has. The actual cost with VR is that it’s pretty much always going to require a space dedicated to it, isolation from your surroundings and whatnot, whatever needed to create that fully immersed experience™. You’re not going to get the defining VR experience by trying to sell at the cheapest price imaginable. You have to be the best with it.
    AR will definitely be the other side of things, the Pokemon Go of gaming as opposed to the Uncharted. Everything that analogy implies is probably going to indicate the way the wind blows. Easy, simple, fashionable, popular, not many companies will be profitable making software for it, yada yada.
    there’s a lot of other things that will happen, like how gaming needs to learn from every other medium and not be bound to operating systems, or how hardware will become less and less important over time. I didn’t want to make this comment 10000 words long though, so I’ll stop here.

  6. #6
    I tend to think of software interaction in two ways:
    1) Experiences that tend to have a high expense tied to them (that expense does not have to be money by the way; it could be time, effort, space) but return with an extremely valuable experience that consumes you in the moment.
    2) Experiences that are smaller in scope, bite-sized and may not by itself be world-changing, but is easily accessible at any given moment and really convenient.

    A lot of people tend to think that if a product doesnít do the second one, itís a failure (this is especially true with the press) but I disagree; most successful products only focus on one of the two. Gaming itself consists of a broad range of things, so there will be products that fit in one and products that fit in the other, but it will all be gaming nonetheless. The big question is, what are those products? Itís most likely to be VR and AR.
    VR is the high-cost, high-reward one. While I donít want to undermine the efforts it takes to make great VR hardware, the size and weight of headsets and whether or not they become wireless is not some huge obstacle against the long term success of the industry. Thatíll change over time like every industry has. The actual cost with VR is that itís pretty much always going to require a space dedicated to it, isolation from your surroundings and whatnot, whatever needed to create that fully immersed experienceô. Youíre not going to get the defining VR experience by trying to sell at the cheapest price imaginable. You have to be the best with it.
    AR will definitely be the other side of things, the Pokemon Go of gaming as opposed to the Uncharted. Everything that analogy implies is probably going to indicate the way the wind blows. Easy, simple, fashionable, popular, not many companies will be profitable making software for it, yada yada.
    thereís a lot of other things that will happen, like how gaming needs to learn from every other medium and not be bound to operating systems, or how hardware will become less and less important over time. I didnít want to make this comment 10000 words long though, so Iíll stop here.

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